The World’s First Grand Lodge

The world’s first Grand Lodge – looking back to where it all started

Three hundred years ago, in a room in a pub, history was made. Were it possible to travel in time, it would be fascinating to bring back the brethren who came together at the Goose and Gridiron alehouse in London on 24 June 1717, when they elected the first Grand Master and brought into being the first Grand Lodge in the world, writes John Hamill, Director of Special Projects for the United Grand Lodge of England (UGLE).

According to James Anderson in the 1738 Constitutions of the Free-Masons, four lodges met at the alehouse in St Paul’s Churchyard. Named after the public houses where they usually met, the lodges were Goose and Gridiron Ale-house in St Paul’s Church-yard; the Crown Ale-house in Parker’s Lane off Drury Lane; the Apple-Tree Tavern in Charles Street, Covent Garden; and the Rummer and Grapes Tavern in Channel Row, Westminster.

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Freemasonry in the news (The Economist)

The Economist explains

What is freemasonry?

Misinformation and conspiracy abound. Is it a benign organization or one bent on subverting government?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published Feb 27, 2018

The literature on freemasonry does not offer straightforward explanations. Is it benign or bent on subverting government? Is it a community of knowledge or of the occult? Such questions are not new. Since its development in the 18th century, freemasonry has drawn the ire of the Catholic church, right-wing politicians and, more recently, Britain’s Home Office. (Fearing that masons in the police and judiciary were giving preferential treatment to other masons, the Home Office between 1998 and 2009 required judicial appointees to disclose their membership.) Freemasonry can appear incomprehensible because it contains no coherent ideology or doctrine, and is defined instead by a commitment to universal brotherhood and self-improvement. Nor does a single governing body exist. It is made up of a loose network of groups, known as lodges, that fall under regional and national grand lodges. What, then, is freemasonry all about? Continue reading →

About the Master’s Medal 2018

168 Years of Doylestown Lodge. Embossed in the center is a representation of the Plumb, a well-known Masonic symbol representing “integrity.” As a Mason, we are taught to stand tall and walk uprightly before God and Man. The ribbon is blue and white, and while the color blue is frequently associated with integrity, the combination of blue and white is also used to promote the ideas of knowledge and charity.