The Masonic Family: Knights Templar

With their own terminology and structures, Masonic Orders offer new opportunities for growth, development, and friendship in Freemasonry. Over the next year, Freemasonry Today will spotlight the origins, requirements, and beliefs of the other Orders – starting with the Knights Templar.

When did it begin?

The earliest records of the masonic Knights Templar can be found in the minutes of the Chapter of Friendship in Portsmouth dated 1778. At that time, the degree was worked under lodges and chapters warranted by the Antient Grand Lodge using a variety of rituals. Lancashire had 10 of the first 40 encampments (now called Preceptories).

Continue reading →

Inside the Freemasons

Netflix has started streaming availability of “Inside the Freemasons,” the five-part documentary shown in England on Sky1 network during the United Grand Lodge of England’s 300th anniversary celebration last year. The program was that rarest of television treatments of the fraternity – calm, even-handed, truthful – and features numerous Masons throughout England discussing their membership. It was created with the cooperation of the grand lodge

The World’s First Grand Lodge

The world’s first Grand Lodge – looking back to where it all started

Three hundred years ago, in a room in a pub, history was made. Were it possible to travel in time, it would be fascinating to bring back the brethren who came together at the Goose and Gridiron alehouse in London on 24 June 1717, when they elected the first Grand Master and brought into being the first Grand Lodge in the world, writes John Hamill, Director of Special Projects for the United Grand Lodge of England (UGLE).

According to James Anderson in the 1738 Constitutions of the Free-Masons, four lodges met at the alehouse in St Paul’s Churchyard. Named after the public houses where they usually met, the lodges were Goose and Gridiron Ale-house in St Paul’s Church-yard; the Crown Ale-house in Parker’s Lane off Drury Lane; the Apple-Tree Tavern in Charles Street, Covent Garden; and the Rummer and Grapes Tavern in Channel Row, Westminster.

Continue reading →