About the Master’s Medal 2020

170 Years of Doylestown Lodge. Embossed in the center is a flaming torch, figuratively representing energy, transformation, enlightenment, and problem-solving. Embossed on the handle is a triangle (or Delta) indicative of the manual carriage of light by humankind and the transformation it thus creates. The Latin phrase “Quaerimus Usque In Sempiternum” below the torch means “Forever Seeking” while the blue, white, and yellow striped ribbon represents the ongoing journey to enlightenment as illuminated by the Sun and Moon.

2020 Bro. Matheu C. Wilson, W.M.

The Masonic Family: THE ROYAL ORDER OF SCOTLAND

With their own terminology, structures and practices, each masonic Order is different from the next. Freemasonry Today breaks down the origins, requirements and organization of the Royal Order of Scotland. One of the most historic Orders in Freemasonry, The Royal Order of Scotland’s ritual traditions reach back 700 years to Robert the Bruce.

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Welcome to Doylestown Lodge

Since 1850, the Masonic Temple at 55 East State Street has been the central hub of York Rite Freemasonry in Bucks County. With over 570 members, Doylestown is one of the largest and most active fraternal lodges in the state of Pennsylvania. As the old saying goes: “My boy, if you are not a Doylestown Freemason, you are strictly NOT IN IT.

The World’s First Grand Lodge

The world’s first Grand Lodge – looking back to where it all started

Three hundred years ago, in a room in a pub, history was made. Were it possible to travel in time, it would be fascinating to bring back the brethren who came together at the Goose and Gridiron alehouse in London on 24 June 1717, when they elected the first Grand Master and brought into being the first Grand Lodge in the world, writes John Hamill, Director of Special Projects for the United Grand Lodge of England (UGLE).

According to James Anderson in the 1738 Constitutions of the Free-Masons, four lodges met at the alehouse in St Paul’s Churchyard. Named after the public houses where they usually met, the lodges were Goose and Gridiron Ale-house in St Paul’s Church-yard; the Crown Ale-house in Parker’s Lane off Drury Lane; the Apple-Tree Tavern in Charles Street, Covent Garden; and the Rummer and Grapes Tavern in Channel Row, Westminster.

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